Protecting Your Children on the Web
October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Today's blog discusses protecting your children from malicious Web activity.
2nd Place in the U.S. European Command Joint Cyber Center sponsored poster contest for middle school students as part of National Cyber Security Awareness Month. For more about the poster contest, visit U.S. Army Garrison Stuttgart's website at http://www.stuttgartcitizen.net/2013/10/cyber-security-awareness-shared-responsibility/.
1 photo: Viruzilla
Photo 1 of 1: 2nd Place in the U.S. European Command Joint Cyber Center sponsored poster contest for middle school students as part of National Cyber Security Awareness Month. For more about the poster contest, visit U.S. Army Garrison Stuttgart's website at http://www.stuttgartcitizen.net/2013/10/cyber-security-awareness-shared-responsibility/. Download full-resolution version

The Internet is a valuable tool and primary source of entertainment for children, but kids face similar threats online as they do in real life.  Parents can supervise and educate their children to keep them safe online using the same rules as they do offline.

Supervise

“Keep an eye on them” - Put the family computer in a public space such as the living room. You can’t watch everything your child does, but occasionally make sure they aren’t visiting inappropriate websites or using improper language when chatting. Ask your child about the sites they are visiting or slang they are using if you are unsure.

“Where have you been?” - It isn’t possible to be present whenever your children are online, but it is possible to check later and see where they have spent time by reviewing your browser history. Parents should be aware of what social networks their kids and teens use and how much information they share.

Educate

“Don’t talk to strangers” - Don't communicate with strangers online and never agree to meet in person. Tell a parent or another adult if a stranger contacts you in a chat room or through email or text message.

“Look both ways before crossing the street”- Don't share your personal formation online for any reason, unless your parents say it's OK. Personal information is your name, address, age, phone number, birthday, email address, where you go to school, or other facts about you.

“All that glitters is not gold” - Email offering something free, like a cell phone or concert tickets are usually tricks designed to get you to give up personal information.

“The Golden Rule” – Don’t say anything online about someone else that you would not want said about you.

Teach the family to “Stop” before clicking, “Think(does this site or individual really need my information or is the deal too good to be true?) before you “Connect”!

Check back to see how EUCOM is working with Stop.Think.Connect. to make the Internet a safer place for everyone by visiting our website http://www.eucom.mil.

To learn more, visit www.dhs.gov/stopthinkconnect.

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