24th MEU completes training in Iceland
The 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit completed the Iceland portion of Trident Juncture by conducting an amphibious air assault and cold weather training Oct. 17 – 21.
A V-22 Osprey departs from USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
11 photos: 24th MEU conducts Icelandic air assault rehearsal
Photo 1 of 11: A V-22 Osprey departs from USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale) Download full-resolution version
U.S. Navy MH-60s conduct touch and go drills aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Navy MH-60s conduct touch and go drills aboard USS Iwo Jima
Photo 2 of 11: U.S. Navy MH-60s conduct touch and go drills aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima
Photo 3 of 11: A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
U.S. Navy Adm. James G. Foggo III, meets with Marines aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Oct 17, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture is a planned exercise to enhance U.S. and NATO partners' and allies abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. Foggo is commander of Allied Joint Force Command Naples, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Navy Adm James G. Foggo III, meets with Marines aboard USS Iwo Jima
Photo 4 of 11: U.S. Navy Adm. James G. Foggo III, meets with Marines aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Oct 17, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture is a planned exercise to enhance U.S. and NATO partners' and allies abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. Foggo is commander of Allied Joint Force Command Naples, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima
Photo 5 of 11: A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima
Photo 6 of 11: A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion flies toward Keflavik Air Base, Iceland, Oct. 17, 2018, to conduct an air assault training during  Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Exercise Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO partners’ and Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion flies toward Keflavik Air Base, Iceland
Photo 7 of 11: A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion flies toward Keflavik Air Base, Iceland, Oct. 17, 2018, to conduct an air assault training during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Exercise Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO partners’ and Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
11 photos: US Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima
Photo 8 of 11: A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor) Download full-resolution version
Marines with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, load onto a CH-53E Sea Stallion aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
11 photos: 24th MEU conducts Icelandic air assault rehearsal
Photo 9 of 11: Marines with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, load onto a CH-53E Sea Stallion aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale) Download full-resolution version
A Marine prepares for take-off in a V-22 Osprey aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
11 photos: 24th MEU conducts Icelandic air assault rehearsal
Photo 10 of 11: A Marine prepares for take-off in a V-22 Osprey aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale) Download full-resolution version
A CH-53E Sea Stallion prepares for take-off aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
11 photos: 24th MEU conducts Icelandic air assault rehearsal
Photo 11 of 11: A CH-53E Sea Stallion prepares for take-off aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale) Download full-resolution version
A V-22 Osprey departs from USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
U.S. Navy MH-60s conduct touch and go drills aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
U.S. Navy Adm. James G. Foggo III, meets with Marines aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Oct 17, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture is a planned exercise to enhance U.S. and NATO partners' and allies abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. Foggo is commander of Allied Joint Force Command Naples, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, in preparation for Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
A U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion flies toward Keflavik Air Base, Iceland, Oct. 17, 2018, to conduct an air assault training during  Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Exercise Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO partners’ and Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
A U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey prepares for takeoff aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), Oct. 17, 2018, off the coast of Iceland during Exercise Trident Juncture 2018. Trident Juncture enhances U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively and conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brennon A. Taylor)
Marines with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, load onto a CH-53E Sea Stallion aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
A Marine prepares for take-off in a V-22 Osprey aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)
A CH-53E Sea Stallion prepares for take-off aboard USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) while conducting an air assault in Icelandic terrain Oct. 17. Iceland’s unique terrain and climate allows for Marines to be better prepared and rapidly deploy in support of NATO Allies and partners. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Margaret Gale)

REYKJAVIK, ICELAND – The 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit completed the Iceland portion of Exercise Trident Juncture 18 by conducting an amphibious air assault and cold-weather training Oct. 17 – 21, 2018. The Iceland portion of Trident Juncture allowed the 24th MEU to rehearse their amphibious capabilities as a sea-based Marine Air-Ground Task Force and increase their proficiency as an expeditionary force in readiness. Marines with Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, and Combat Logistics Battalion 24, conducted cold-weather training in southwestern Iceland to familiarize their forces with cold-weather operations. Training consisted of a seven mile hike and cold-weather stations where Marines rehearsed how to sustain themselves in cold, windy, and rainy weather conditions. Teaching Marines these skills is vital to combat readiness in any location. “It is important to do this type of training because it familiarizes Marines with the gear we utilize in cold-weather environments,” said Sgt. Justin Belding, a radio operator with 2/2. “It was a great opportunity to see the beautiful Icelandic terrain and experience the cold-weather elements.” While in Iceland, Marines and Sailors have been able to build valuable teamwork and camaraderie skills while training in a unique, cold-weather environment. Training in Iceland’s extreme and unpredictable climate increased their proficiency and provided unique challenges that they had to overcome in order to complete the mission. “We need to exercise our capabilities in different locations so we can plan for different variables,” said Lt. Col. Misca Geter, an executive officer with 24th MEU. “The weather and terrain of Iceland forced us to plan around those factors. I’d like to thank the government of Iceland for allowing us to conduct this training in their beautiful country.” The cold-weather training, combined with the air assault, sets the conditions for the 24th MEU to conduct efficient amphibious operations in Norway for the final portion of Trident Juncture. The product of Trident Juncture will be a more ready and combat proficient MAGTF, capable of fulfilling a range of military operations for national command authorities and geographical combatant commanders.

Trying to find something?
Search on any term here:
;