EUCOM hosts NATO logistics courses
STUTTGART, Germany - More than 50 people attended the North Atlantic Treaty Organization lectures and discussion that improves the U.S. European Command's logistics capabilities and ability at Patch Barracks Jan. 14-15.
STUTTGART, Germany — Army Lt. Col. Craig Schwartz, North Atlantic Treaty Organization Course Instructor, leads a lecture during the 2-day NATO Logistics courses here, Jan. 14. The training courses are normally held in Oberammergau, Germany, but were brought to the U.S. European Command's staff to provide a rare training opportunity. (Department of Defense photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rob Hazelett)
1 photo: STUTTGART, Germany — Army Lt. Col. Craig Schwartz, North Atlantic Treaty Organization Course Instructor, leads a lecture during the 2-day NATO Logistics courses here, Jan. 14. The training cours
Photo 1 of 1: STUTTGART, Germany — Army Lt. Col. Craig Schwartz, North Atlantic Treaty Organization Course Instructor, leads a lecture during the 2-day NATO Logistics courses here, Jan. 14. The training courses are normally held in Oberammergau, Germany, but were brought to the U.S. European Command's staff to provide a rare training opportunity. (Department of Defense photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rob Hazelett) Download full-resolution version

STUTTGART, Germany - More than 50 people attended the North Atlantic Treaty Organization lectures and discussion that improves the U.S. European Command's logistics capabilities and ability at Patch Barracks Jan. 14-15.

The training courses are normally held in Oberammergau, Germany, but were brought to the EUCOM staff to provide a rare training opportunity to engage with NATO logistics.

"This is an abridged version of the NATO Basic Logistics course, which is taught at the NATO School,," said Army Lt. Col. Brett Turner, Logistics Engagement Branch (ECJ4). "We are interested in improving our knowledge of NATO Logistics, without sending everyone to the one-week course at Oberammergau. We took the subjects from the normal course and selected those most meaningful to our audience here at EUCOM."

The lectures, however, will return to Oberammergau when the next courses start March 23.

"This is a one-time deal we coordinated with the NATO school," said Turner. "We think this is a great opportunity to increase our knowledge of NATO logistics, which will help us in working with our NATO allies on logistics issues."

The NATO school opened in 1952 and offers 82 different courses in multiple iterations of each, said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Craig Schwartz, NATO Course Instructor.

"Generally, I hope people learn about NATO, and how it can open their eyes to what it has to offer and its limitations," said Schwartz. "We love teaching these shorter courses because we reach a large audience and it's cost effective."

Another course instructor explained how he felt the discussions would help those in attendance apply their knowledge.

"I think these courses will teach people to be more familiar with basic information about NATO," said Croatian Army Maj. Darko Vukosavic, NATO Course Director and Instructor "I'd also like to invite others to attend the NATO school so they can take classes releated to NATO logistics."

Some of the NATO Logistics courses during the two days included NATO Multinational Logistics and Logistics Policies and Principles, NATO Defense Planning and Logistics, Operational Planning Process and Logistics, Movement and Transfer Concept, Policy and Procedures, Medical Logistics, Logistics and Engineering, Air and Maritime Logistics, NATO Fuels and Force Generation.

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