Polish KFOR soldiers take over at Camp Nothing Hill

1 2 3 4

Soldiers from Polish COY, Multinational Battle Group East, render salutes as the Polish flag is raised during a Transfer of Authority ceremony at Camp Nothing Hill in Leposavic/Leposaviq, Kosovo, Oct. 11. The Polish COY recently took over responsibility of Quick Reaction Force, patrolling and guard duties at Gate 1 along the Administrative Boundary Line with Serbia. Before the Poles, Greek soldiers from Multinational Battle Group North were in charge of these duties at Nothing Hill. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jerry Boffen, 130th Public Affairs Detachment, Connecticut National Guard.)

Danish army Lt. Col. Jens Nyrup, deputy commander of Multinational Battle Group North, addresses the troops that were assembled during a Transfer of Authority ceremony at Camp Nothing Hill in Leposavic/Leposaviq, Kosovo, Oct. 11. The ceremony was held to signify handover of responsibilities at Nothing Hill from MNBG N's Greek soldiers to Polish and U.S. Soldiers from MNBG E. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. Jorge MedinaCintron, 130th Public Affairs Detachment.)

Greek soldiers from Multinational Battle Group North, fold the Greek flag after it was lowered during a Transfer of Authority ceremony at Camp Nothing Hill in Leposavic/Leposaviq, Kosovo, Oct. 11. The Greek soldiers spent four weeks at Nothing Hill, during which time they were responsible for performing Quick Reaction Force duties, patrolling the surrounding area and performing guard duties at Gate 1 along the Administrative Boundary Line with Serbia. During the ceremony the Greek soldiers handed over these responsibilities to the Polish COY from Multinational Battle Group East. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jerry Boffen, 130th Public Affairs Detachment, Connecticut National Guard.)

Spc. Juan Mass, Adjuntas Puerto Rico, a Soldier with A Company, 1st Battalion, 296th Infantry Brigade, Multinational Battle Group East, renders a salute as the U.S. flag is raised during a Transfer of Authority ceremony at Camp Nothing Hill in Leposavic/Leposaviq, Kosovo, Oct. 11. The U.S. COY recently took over responsibility of base security at Nothing Hill. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jerry Boffen, 130th Public Affairs Detachment, Connecticut National Guard.)

LEPOSAVIC/LEPOSAVIQ, Kosovo -- Greek soldiers from Multinational Battle Group North relinquished security duties at Camp Nothing Hill to Polish and U.S. Soldiers from Multinational Battle Group East during a ceremony here, Oct. 11.

The Greek soldiers spent four weeks at Camp Nothing Hill where they served as the area's Quick Reaction Force. Their QRF responsibilities included responding to any situation in Kosovo in a very short amount of time. KFOR’s role as a QRF is as a third responder, behind the Kosovo Police and the European Union Rule of Law Mission.

In addition to holding QRF responsibilities, the Greek soldiers also conducted patrols in neighboring cities and near the Administrative Boundary Line with Serbia, and maintained security at Gate 1 along the ABL.

“This has been a very good experience working with local municipalities, the KP and EULEX in this wonderful area,” said Greek army Capt. Ioannis Goulgoutis, commander of the outgoing Greek soldiers.

The incoming company of Polish soldiers, commanded by Polish army Capt. Piotr Skowlmowski, will now be responsible for the duties previously performed by the Greek soldiers.

“We are now responsible for this area north of MNBG North’s base,” said Skowlmowski. “We’ll be conducting patrols, handling QRF responsibilities and monitoring Gate 1.”

Skowlmowski added that he is very confident in his soldiers and their ability to accomplish any mission they are faced with while at Nothing Hill.

“We trained for several months in Poland to prepare for this deployment, before joining the U.S. troops in Germany for more training,” Skowlmowski said. “We are completely ready to handle this mission.”

A platoon of U.S. Soldiers from MNBG E will join the Polish soldiers for the stay at Camp Nothing Hill. These U.S. infantrymen are Puerto Rico National Guard members who are stationed at Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo as part of the KFOR 13 rotation.

“We’re here to give the Polish COY support as they take over responsibility of Nothing Hill,” said 1st Lt. Whesley Sepulveda, Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico, platoon leader, 1st Platoon, A Company, 1st Battalion, 296th Infantry Regiment, Puerto Rico National Guard. “Our role is to provide security for the base and the Polish soldiers will handle the surrounding areas.”

The ceremony, which signifies the transfer of authority from the Greek soldiers to the Polish and U.S. soldiers, involved the lowering of the Greek flag and the raising of the Polish and U.S. flags.

Following the raising and lowering of the flags, Danish Lt. Col. Jens Nyrup, deputy commander, MNBG N, addressed the soldiers that were assembled for the ceremony.

“Your presence here testifies KFOR’s interest and its capability to involve all units as a whole in the security of all of Kosovo’s inhabitants regardless of their communities,” Nyrup told the soldiers. “It shows KFOR’s ability to operate everywhere with impartiality.”

He then thanked the outgoing Greek soldiers for their hard work and dedication to their mission at Nothing Hill.
“Through your initiatives and your relevant understanding of the situation,” Nyrup told the Greek soldiers, “you did a great job and helped the Battle Group by always keeping the situation in this area in grip.”

Nyrup concluded the ceremony by addressing the incoming Polish and U.S. Soldiers and wishing them luck.

“No doubt you will face challenges,” he told them, “but I am sure that you will be present and capable of tackling the different tasks that come to you. Welcome and good luck to you. I hope you will enjoy your stay in this beautiful part of Kosovo.”

Find more articles tagged with:

Comments: 0

Your comment:

Related Topics

A Hungarian Special Forces Medic, right, directs the evacuation of a simulated casualty to safety to his Romanian SOF medic counterpart during the Field Training Exercise as part of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) course held in Udbina, Croatia. 
U.S. Special Operations Command Europe (SOCEUR) developed and conducted the TCCC Train-the-Trainer course to enhance the SOF capability and interoperability of SOF medics from eight NATO and partner nations, but most importantly, to incorporate one recognized standard for managing trauma on the battlefield. (U.S. Army photo by Master Sgt. Donald Sparks, SOCEUR Public Affairs Officer  â? photo approved for public release by Master Sgt. Donald Sparks, SOCEUR PAO).

Ready Forces

VAZIANI TRAINING AREA, Republic of Georgia-In front of a color detail with the national colors of America and the Republic of Georgia and the unit colors of the U.S. Marine Corps and Georgian military, Maj. Eric J. Andersen, executive officer Black Sea Rotational Force 11 and Kent, Wash., native,  â?forms the troops for the opening ceremony of Exercise Agile Spirit 2011, marking the official start of what is scheduled to be an annual training event with the partner nation. Marines with Alpha Company of Anti-Terrorism Battalion, and 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion deployed to Georgia for their annual training to supplement the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force deployment of BSRF-11, to conduct counterinsurgency and peacekeeping operations training at Vaziani Training Area. , Cpl. Tatum Vayavananda

International Cooperation

Flag of Greece

Greece

Flag of Kosovo

Kosovo

Flag of Poland

Poland

NATO flag

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)

Related Articles

U